Francine Shapiro Library: EMDR Bibliography

Find an item by title:

Find an item by author's last name:

Find an item by keyword:

 Your Results - you searched for the keyword Freedom 10 Results    

  Sort Results By:

1. Andler, K. (2013, April). Self-administered EMDR therapy: Freedom from anxiety, anger and depression. Kindle Edition, Serpens Publishing.

Language: English

Format: Book

Abstract:
Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy has been used for over two decades to heal anxiety, depression, anger, and the many more symptoms of having unprocessed memories in our brains. Whether we've experienced small or major trauma, and whether we are aware of the foundation of our issues, EMDR will desensitize disturbing and painful thoughts, sensations, images, and emotions, and turn around our negative beliefs. This guide explains the theory behind the therapy, and what to expect from self-administered EMDR. It provides a framework for self-help so that you can apply the 8 stages of EMDR correctly without the need of a therapist.

Keywords: Anger, Anxiety  Depression  Self-Administered EMDR  


2. Errebo, N., & Sommers-Flanagan, R. (2007). EMDR and emotionally focused couple therapy for war veteran couples. In F. Shaprio, F. W. Kaslow, & L. Maxfield (Eds.), Handbook of EMDR and family therapy processes (pp. 202-222). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons Inc.

Language: English

Format: Book Section

Abstract:
To help veteran couples, therapists need to understand the effect of war on the warrior, the impact of the warrior's experience on intimate relationships, and effective individual and couple treatments. These considerations are discussed in this chapter. Topic include war trauma and complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); effects of PTSD symptoms on veterans and their intimate relationships; problems in veterans' marital relationships; and treatment considerations. The therapy process described here is an integration of Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy (EFT) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). In case conceptualization and treatment planning, EMDR and EFT can be woven together harmoniously; many of their theoretical concepts and procedural steps are compatible with or parallel to one another. EFT and EMDR are first described separately. Next, the parallels between the two treatments are discussed. Then a plan is presented for combining EMDR and EFT in comprehensive treatment for couples affected by war trauma. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

Keywords: Couples Therapy  EFT  Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy  Emotion Focused Therapy  Emotional Freedom Technique  Military  Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  PTSD  Trauma  Veterans  War Trauma  War Veteran Couples  


3. Greway, G. (2003). Personality change in trauma victims by the use of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, resource development and installation, and emotional freedom techniques. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B. Sciences and Engineering, 64(4), 1902.

Language: English

Format: Dissertation/Thesis

Abstract:
Personality change in victims of trauma has been demonstrated by key researchers in the field of trauma. This research explored this area further by studying if problem personality patterns can improve to healthier levels by processing trauma symptoms with new rapid trauma techniques. This research provides new information in trauma and personality, as well as offers links to possible new treatment methods. The hypothesis tested in this research was that significant change in problem personality patterns would occur in trauma subjects whose symptoms were processed through a multi-impact therapy that included Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), building ego structure through Resource Installation and Development and reducing physiological stress through the use of Emotional Freedom Techniques, as compared to subjects in the control group who received talking therapy. A sample of ten female participants was selected that had traumatic backgrounds and posttraumatic symptoms. All subjects received the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III (MCMI III) as a pre and a post test, and the Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) throughout 14 weeks of treatment. The PAS provided a means to measure subjects through descriptive statistics and the MCMI III measured the three highest clinical personality scales and the changes that occurred after the treatment. Within the two groups, the results of the PAS showed that talking therapy may be extremely helpful for personality improvement for some individuals processing trauma issues, but not all. The MCMI III results showed that the multi-impact group appeared to be somewhat more stable, meaning that the multi-impact treatment appeared to aid improvement on all three personality scales. The talking treatment group showed improvement on the most problematic personality scale, minimal increase on the second highest personality scale, and the third highest personality scale became significantly worse as compared to the multi-impact treatment group. This confirmed the hypothesis that there would be significant change in clinical personality scores. This implies that the multi-impact treatment helped individuals in a more efficient manner, in that improvement on personality syndromes or disorders was global. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

Keywords: Emotional Freedom Techniques  Emotional Trauma  Emotions  Freedom  Empirical Study  Personality Change  Resource Development  Resource Installation  Trauma Victims  


4. Karatzias, T., Power, K., Brown, K., McGoldrick, T., Begum, M., Young, J., Loughran, P., Chouliara, Z., & Adams, S. (2011, June). A controlled comparison of the effectiveness and efficiency of two psychological therapies for posttraumatic stress disorder: Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing vs. emotional freedom techniques. Journal of Nervous Mental Disease, 199(6), 372-378. doi:10.1097/NMD.0b013e31821cd262.

Language: English

Format: Journal

Abstract:
The present study reports on the first ever controlled comparison between eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) and emotional freedom techniques (EFT) for posttraumatic stress disorder. A total of 46 participants were randomized to either EMDR (n = 23) or EFT (n = 23). The participants were assessed at baseline and then reassessed after an 8-week waiting period. Two further blind assessments were conducted at posttreatment and 3-months follow-up. Overall, the results indicated that both interventions produced significant therapeutic gains at posttreatment and follow-up in an equal number of sessions. Similar treatment effect sizes were observed in both treatment groups. Regarding clinical significant changes, a slightly higher proportion of patients in the EMDR group produced substantial clinical changes compared with the EFT group. Given the speculative nature of the theoretical basis of EFT, a dismantling study on the active ingredients of EFT should be subject to future research.

Keywords: EFT  Emotional Freedom Technique  Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  PTSD  


5. Kruse, M. J. (2011, June). The effect of energy psychology on rates of relapse and recidivism for substance abuse offenders in a community correction setting. The University of the Rockies, Colorado Springs, CO. AAI3460565.

Language: English

Format: Dissertation/Thesis

Abstract:
This dissertation was a study of a community corrections program which incorporated adjunct Energy Psychology Therapies for Substance Abuse Offenders (SAOs), who were transitioning back into community. Rates of relapse and recidivism were compared, upon success/failure to complete drug and alcohol treatment. When Energy Psychology therapies were added, assisting offenders in resolving underlying trauma issues, there were significance differences between groups. The Choices Program used brief therapies including: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, Thought Field Therapy, Emotional Freedom Techniques, (EMDR, TFT, EFT) along with group and individual classes/sessions to relieve underlying trauma symptoms. The results indicated that people who chose to resolve underlying trauma achieved more successful treatment outcomes, thereby lowering rates of relapse and recidivism significantly.

Keywords: Community Corrections  EFT  Emotional Freedom Techniques  Empirical Study  Energy Psychology  Offenders Eye Movement  Quantitative Study  Social Sciences  Substance Abuse  Trauma  


6. Russell, M. C. (2008). War-related medically unexplained symptoms, prevalence, and treatment: Utilizing EMDR within the armed services. Journal of EMDR Practice and Research, 2(3), 212-225. doi:10.1891/1933-3196.2.3.212.

Language: English

Format: Journal

Abstract:
The mental health impact of war is often underestimated by military, government, and media officials who focus primarily on well-known conditions like depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) while ignoring the complex toll of modern warfare. These effects are clearly evident in "war syndromes," many of which can be collectively understood as medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). The current study provides a brief historical review of combat-related MUS as well as an analysis of present evidence of a possible "Iraqi War Syndrome." An overview of past and current treatments for combat MUS is followed by a single case study treating an Iraqi war combat veteran with combat-related MUS with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). Therapy resulted in significant improvement of the patient's 1-year psychophysical condition and comorbid PTSD. We provide a detailed account of those treatment sessions as well as a discussion of EMDR's potential to simultaneously treat a range of combat-related psychophysical conditions without requiring extensive homework or self-disclosure that some military patients may resist. The results are promising, but they require further research. [Author Abstract]

Keywords: Adults  Americans  Iraq War  Marine Personnel  Medically Unexplained Symptoms  Military Psychiatry  Operation Iraqi Freedom  Combat  Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  Psychotherapeutic Processes  PTSD  Somatic Symptoms  Veterans  War Syndromes  


7. Schmidt, G. (2007, September). Symptome als loyalitätsleistungen und ihre hypnosystemische utilisation in EDxTM, EFT und EMDR [Symptoms than loyalty services and their utilization in hypnotism, EDxTM, EFT and EMDR]. Presentation at the 1st European Energy Psychology and Psychotherapy Conference, Heidelberg, Germany.

Language: German

Format: Conference

Keywords: EDxTM  EFT  Emotional Freedom Technique  Hypnosis  


8. Seubert, A. (2008, September ). The courage to feel: Guiding clients into the power and freedom of emotional honesty. Poster presented at the 13th EMDR International Association Conference, Phoenix, AZ.

Language: English

Format: Conference

Keywords: Emotional Honesty  Poster  


9. Vilaseca, G. A. (2010, October/November). “Deconstrucción dramática” Un modelo de abordaje grupal psicodramático del estress laboral y el burn out integrando EFT y EMDR ["Deconstruction drama" A model of the psychodrama group approach and work stress burn out integrating EFT and EMDR]. Presentation at the 2nd EMDR Ibero-American Conference, Quito, Ecuador.

Language: Spanish

Format: Conference

Keywords: Burnout  EFT  Emotional Freedom Technique  Psychodrama  


10. Weisberg, D. (1999, April 27). Quick fix?  Patients say new therapy offer freedom from past traumas in a short time. Pittsburgh, PA:  Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Sooner, Health, G-3.

Language: English

Format: Newspaper

Abstract:
Months later, she gave therapy another try, this time seeing Peggy Elkus, a Regent Square psychologist who is certified to practice a controversial technique many therapists have never even heard of. Called EMDR - for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing - it enabled Troup, in just three sessions, to find peace after decades of pain.

Keywords: Overview  General  Pittsburgh